The Chinese magazin SPACE featured our studio in a one hundred pages article along with an interview.

No matter what we design, it is always communication.

SPACE Magazin December 2014

What originally made you want to study architecture and become a designer?
GUNTER: My interest in art and art history began at an early age. I was fortunate to travel around Europe a lot as a child and teenager. The architectural treasures I saw on my travels made a lasting impression and were a formative influence on me. I eventually realized this is the path I want to pursue.
PETER: I tried out various things after graduating from high school. I worked as a wine merchant for a while and also on a construction site. Then practically overnight I decided to move to Paris, without really knowing what I wanted to do there. The freedom of not having to do something gave me time to explore the city for myself. I walked its streets, discovered its hidden places and drew what I saw. At some point I realized, I’m going to be an architect.

We first became friends when we shared an apartment. We understand each other perfectly and can rely on one another absolutely.

What particular aspects of your background and upbringing have shaped your design principles and philosophies?
PETER: I have had many inspiring mentors. My parents taught me self-confidence and generosity. Working with Daniel Libeskind made me realize that architecture contains implicit meaning(s) and it was there that I saw the absolute in our work. Ben Nicholson in Chicago taught me about the simultaneity of the sacred and profane; the gift of curiosity and being open to quite disparate positions and approaches, of developing something from this starting point and never forgetting to retain a sense of humour.

Who or what has been the biggest single influence on your way of thinking?
GUNTER: During my travels when I was 15 years old, I met an emeritus professor quite by chance in London. He took to me and began to show me his city. After this first encounter, many subsequent visits ensued. We visited museums, he taught me about history, art history and art and always put them in the context of the country, politics and society. It was he who taught me to perceive the interconnectedness of things.

Peter: Would you tell us who Gunter is in your eyes? What (personalities/qualities) about him that you like the best?
PETER: We first became friends when we shared an apartment. Today I feel very fortunate and consider it a great privilege that I was able to build up a business with a true friend. Our personal connection gives me the certainty that we will always remain loyal in our dealings with one another. We understand each other perfectly and can rely on one another absolutely. This is an extremely important quality of our cooperation – and of course he’s an excellent architect too.

Gunter: Would you tell us who Peter is in your eyes? What (personalities/qualities) about him that you like the best?
GUNTER: We are very different people, but we complement each other perfectly. I am a less extrovert person and find it easy to stay calm under pressure. Which is why I particularly value Peter’s spontaneity and the passion he invests in all his undertakings.

Which architects or designers working today do you most admire?
We see a lot of work that we find exciting. But we don’t have role models as such and do not have a top ten. If I had to list a few names quite spontaneously I would say Kengo Kuma, Jean Nouvel, Patrick Jouin and Patricia Urquiola.

We are interested in all visual forms of representation. Everything can be a source of inspiration to us: daily life and art, an ashtray as much as a Michelangelo.

Personally, what are you currently fascinated by outside of the profession, and how does it influence your work?
We have a very wide take on the world. And we are interested in all visual forms of representation. Everything can be a source of inspiration to us: daily life and art, an ashtray as much as a Michelangelo. We take this broad view of the world to the questions we address. It is without a doubt a very special quality of our studio to take such a broad spectrum of inspiration on board, to unite impossible things, to think laterally and ultimately produce something without precedent.

What is your strongest skill?
PETER: Courage and impartiality. I’m not put off by: “You’re not allowed to do it like that”. So you dare to do things that may seem completely crazy on rational appraisal. Which is why we stick 50,000 letters onto the wall of an exhibition stand or sign a contract that obligates us to produce the complete interior for an Uzbek state palace in only 5 months. It’s about giving credence to every thought and every idea. I also enjoy trying out new things all the time.

In general, how do you start a design? And what kind of question would you ask yourself?
We first attempt to understand what the project is really about. What motivates the client, what is the world like in which he operates? This results in a multifaceted picture with a whole range of parameters. The next stage is to formulate a strong idea that will be the starting point for our work. We often don’t stop at formulating a single idea, however, but present our clients with several ideas from which to choose. The client can then opt for a specific direction, which allows us to enter into a new dialogue. Then we verify the result and start asking questions all over again if need be.

Working internationally also demands greater self-reflection in your dealings with the client and in your approach to the task in hand.

How do you keep your creativity or how to get rid of conventional thinking? Or how do you try to keep your ideas fresh?
Keep your eyes open and look around yourself. Enter into discussion, admit other ways of thinking, be self-critical. The broad spectrum of our projects also keeps our curiosity keen and offers much scope for variety. This is why we also love working outside of Germany. It teaches us to deal with very different situations and to take other approaches on board. Working internationally also demands greater self-reflection in your dealings with the client and in your approach to the task in hand.

What are you currently interested in and how is it feeding into your designs?
Our core interest is always the question of how to translate our client’s identity into an unmistakable and exceptional project. We are therefore not interested in specific formal elements. Because these things derive from the idea itself and not the other way round.

Compared to other countries that are famous for their design, what is German design’s characteristic?
It is difficult to identify stereotypes for an entire country. But I am certain that we designers share many ‘German virtues’ such as discipline, process reliability, craftsmanship, precision and the desire for perfection in the smallest detail. These are goals we also pursue in everything we do and which produce the extremely high quality in our work.

How did IPPOLITO FLEITZ GROUP begin? What were your (Peter) and your partner’s (Gunter) core values?
We set up our own business straight after graduating. We had this idea to look at things not only from an architect’s perspective. And we wanted to work in an interdisciplinary way. We initially set off down this path with two other partners. Then in 2002, the two of us founded Ippolito Fleitz Group. Our core business values remain the same today as they’ve always been: an interdisciplinary approach, lateral thinking, admitting ideas, no matter how fantastic, being identity architects.

No matter what we design, it is always communication. We understand every space as constructed communication.

How would you describe your approach to design?
No matter what we design, it is always communication. We understand every space as constructed communication. The interaction of sender and recipient, which impressions create a particular attitude, how is it perceived. These are key themes of our work and all have to do with communication.

What is the studio’s strongest or most identifying quality?
Surprise. We frequently succeed in creating surprising, memorable and yet precise images with a strong narrative power that are thought through to the tiniest detail and can be experienced as such.

As an international firm, how do you approach diverse localities from project to project?
We are extremely present in our markets. This either means that we are frequently on-site, often with large project teams depending on the project. In some countries we have a permanent presence through local representatives. It’s important to us that these are always native speakers, so we can encounter our clients in their mother tongue and understand their mentality. The team at our Stuttgart headquarters is also very international. We have people from nine different nations working for us, enabling us to talk to our foreign clients in their own language from our office in Stuttgart. We’re currently looking into the possibility of opening a representative office in China.

Can you tell us about any projects you are currently working on that you are especially excited about?
At the moment we’re especially excited about the Asian market, and China in particular. We are in charge of the Corporate Architecture of international brands such as Adidas or Walter Knoll there. But we’re particularly excited about the Chinese brands that we’re developing for local target groups. We are responsible for the entire brand strategy for jewellery chains Dada and Keer – from spatial communication to visual merchandising. And we’re also designing new store concepts for spectacles manufacturer Bolon. These are all projects in which we must first gain a really thorough understanding of the psychology of the local market. We are also working on a new shopping mall in Moscow, designing a global store concept for Swarovski, developing a large sports complex in Switzerland, supporting a new restaurant chain in Germany and working on various exciting residential projects.

Our company developed the term ‘Identity Architects’ to encompass a broad, lateral thinking approach.

What are your thoughts on generalization vs specialization? From the fields you have set foot in, such as interior, furniture, products, communication design, etc. How do you define your professional identity, architect or broad sense designer? How to distinguish from the current graphic design or advertising company work?
Both of these things are fundamentally essential in the market and in our company. Our company developed the term ‘Identity Architects’ to encompass a broad, lateral thinking approach. Yet over and above a concept-oriented approach, the quality of our work derives from the quality of our employees, who are each highly specialized in their own discipline. This dialectic is what makes our company so special. The ability to perceive the bigger picture, while having an exceptional grasp of fine detail.

You have designed a large amount of restaurant and commercial space, so what’s your opinion about the current situation and trends of worldwide restaurant space design?
We have become much more than classic interior designers in this particular field. We’re now almost always co-shapers or even the driving force behind a comprehensive, integrated conceptualization process. In an era in which design has long become an integral part of everyday culture and trends come and go at an ever faster pace, it has become increasingly difficult to stand out. So it’s even more important to endow concepts with a highly consistent attitude and personality, which make the space something that can be directly experienced, is immediately memorable and worth talking about. In our accelerating world, the desire for authenticity and storytelling in the third place has become increasingly crucial. Innovations are engaged in a tug of war between grounding and mechanization. On one hand the sensual and emotional translation of the food on offer within the space, a staging of the preparation process, as well as the continuing development of sustainability concepts that are by no means at an end. On the other hand, processes and experiences that are becoming increasingly digitalized.

Your work repeatedly won the IF DESIGN AWARD from Germany, GOOD DESIGN AWARD from Japan, RED DOT AWARD from Germany, what’s the advantage do you think you have to win these well-known awards constantly? Could you please share some impressive evaluations of the jury?
Winning these awards is a fantastic confirmation – for us designers and above all for our clients. Because it is our clients who are asked to provide a leap of faith in our work. An independent award jury confirms and rewards this relationship of mutual trust.

We predict two important themes that will shape and influence the future of design. The debate about resources, the interaction between the constructed world and the natural environment, the relationship between city and countryside.

What do you envisage interior design to look like in 10 years?
Our work as designers was and always will be comprised of two things: Mirroring and driving social changes, desires and ideas. We predict two important themes that will shape and influence the future of design. The debate about resources, the interaction between the constructed world and the natural environment, the relationship between city and countryside. For example, how does the megacity impact the design of the actual living and working spaces of its inhabitants? A second important trend will be interaction with the virtual world. The experience of virtual and real spaces will merge and counter-movements will emerge. Consciously analogue and purely digital spaces will become opposite poles and places of escape. We also predict a radical expansion of our material world. Wearables have already become almost commonplace in fashion. In construction, more and more intelligent materials that are able to interact with us are now being used. This is certain to have a big impact on the way we build. The democratization of the production of design, which we are currently experiencing in the form of the 3D printer, also means that our profession must reposition itself in order to retain its right to exist against a growing body of amateur designers.

What advice would give to students and young designers?
Just do it.

DEUTSCHE VERSION DES INTERVIEWS What originally made you want to study architecture and become a designer?
GUNTER: Bei mir wurde schon früh das Interesse an Kunst und Kunstgeschichte geweckt. Ich hatte das Privileg, als Kind und als Jugendlicher viel durch Europa reisen zu können. Die architektonischen Kunstschätze haben sich eingeprägt und haben auch mich geprägt. Irgendwann wusste ich, damit will ich mich weiter beschäftigen.
PETER: Nach dem Abitur habe ich verschiedenes ausprobiert. Ich war unter anderem Weinhändler und habe auf dem Bau gearbeitet. Ganz spontan bin ich dann einfach nach Paris gezogen, ohne zu wissen, was ich dort tun soll. Mit der Freiheit, nichts zu müssen, hatte ich Zeit für die Stadt. Ich habe sie intensiv für mich entdeckt, habe sie mir erlaufen, sie gezeichnet. Irgendwann war mir dann klar: Ich werde Architekt.

What particular aspects of your background and upbringing have shaped your design principles and philosophies?
PETER: Ich habe hier viele Mentoren. Meinen Eltern haben mir Selbstvertrauen und Großzügigkeit beigebracht. In meiner Zeit bei Daniel Libeskind ist mir bewusst geworden, das Architektur Bedeutung(en) hat und ich habe dort die Unbedingtheit in der Arbeit gesehen. Ben Nicholson in Chicago hat mir vor allem die Gleichzeitigkeit von sacred and profan gelehrt. Also die Gabe, ganz unterschiedlichen Positionen und Ansätzen gleichermaßen neugierig und offen zu begegnen, daraus etwas zu entwickeln und dabei den Humor nicht zu vergessen.

Who or what has been the biggest single influence on your way of thinking?
GUNTER: Bei meinen Reisen habe ich im Alter von 15 Jahren in London zufällig einen emeritierten Professor kennengelernt. Er hatte Interesse an mir gefunden und begann, mir seine Stadt zu zeigen. Auf die erste Begegnung folgten viele Besuche. Wir besuchten viele Museen, er erklärte mir die Geschichte, die Kunstgeschichte und die Kunst und stellte immer wieder Bezüge zu seinem Land, zu Politik und Gesellschaft her. Von ihm habe ich gelernt, die übergeordneten Zusammenhänge verstehen zu wollen.

Peter: Would you tell us who Gunter is in your eyes? What (personalities/qualities) about him that you like the best?
Unsere gemeinsame Geschichte begann, als wir gemeinsam in einer WG lebten. In dieser Zeit sind wir Freunde geworden. Heute betrachte ich es als Glück und Privileg, das ich das Büro mit einem Freund aufbauen durfte. Durch die persönliche Beziehung habe ich die Gewissheit, dass wir absolut loyal zueinander sind. Wir verstehen uns blind und können uns aufeinander verlassen. Das ist extrem wichtige Qualität unserer Zusammenarbeit, ganz abgesehen davon, dass er ein hervorragender Architekt ist.

Gunter: Would you tell us who Peter is in your eyes? What (personalities/qualities) about him that you like the best?
Wir sind beide sehr unterschiedliche Charaktere. Aber wir ergänzen uns auch auf dieser Ebene perfekt. Ich bin eher der ruhige Typ. Es fällt mir nicht so schwer, gelassen zu sein. Umso mehr schätze ich an Peter seine Spontanität und die Leidenschaftlichkeit, mit der er die Dinge angeht.

Which architects or designers working today do you most admire?
Wir sehen sehr viel, was wir bei unseren Kollegen spannend finden. Aber wir haben in dem Sinne keine Helden und wollen auch keine Rankinglisten erstellen. Wenn wir spontan ein paar Namen sagen müssten, wären das Kengo Kuma, Jean Nouvel, Patrick Jouin oder Patricia Urquiola.

Personally, what are you currently fascinated by outside of the profession, and how does it influence your work?
Wir schauen in einer großen Bandbreite auf die Welt. Uns interessieren alle visuellen Arten der Darstellungen. Alles kann uns hier inspirieren: Alltag und Kunst, ein Aschenbecher genauso wie ein Michelangelo. Genau mit diesem breiten Blick gehen wir dann unsere Fragestellungen an. Es ist sicherlich eine besondere Qualität unseres Studios, sich maximal inspirieren zu lassen, die unmöglichen Dinge zu vereinigen, querzudenken und daraus etwas Neues entwickeln.

What is your strongest skill? PI: Mut und Furchtlosigkeit. Ich habe keine Angst vor dem „so macht man das aber nicht“. So traut man sich auch Dinge, die man rein rational für absolut verrückt hält. Und deshalb setzen wir eben für einen Messestand 50000 Steckbuchstaben auf Wände oder wir unterschreiben einen Vertrag, in dem wir uns verpflichten, innerhalb von 5 Monaten einen usbekischen Staatspalast im Inneren vollständig auszugestalten. Es gilt immer erst einmal, jede Idee, jeden Gedanke zuzulassen. Und außerdem habe ich Freude daran, immer wieder etwas Neues auszuprobieren.

In general, how do you start a design? And what kind of question would you ask yourself?
Zunächst wollen wir verstehen, um was es eigentlich geht. Was treibt unseren Kunden an, in welcher Welt bewegt er sich? Daraus ergibt sich ein komplexes Bild mit verschiedensten Parametern. Nun gilt es, daraus eine starke Idee zu formulieren, die Ausgangspunkt für die eigentliche Arbeit ist. Oft genug ist es aber so, dass wir nicht nur eine Idee formulieren, sondern wir unseren Kunden mehrere Ideen aufzeigen. Der Kunde kann sich zwischen verschiedenen Richtungen entscheiden und wir kommen darüber in einen neuen Dialog mit ihm. Dann gilt es, das Ergebnis zu prüfen – und gegebenenfalls die Fragen neu zu stellen.

How do you keep your creativity or how to get rid of conventional thinking?or how do you try to keep your ideas fresh?
Schauen, schauen, umschauen. Sich in Diskurs begeben, andere Denkweisen zulassen, selbstkritisch sein. Aber auch das breite Spektrum unserer Projekte hält unsere Neugierde hoch und bietet immer wieder Abwechslung. So ist es für uns sehr spannend, im Ausland zu arbeiten. Wir müssen uns ganz neuen Situationen stellen, lernen andere Denkweisen. Gerade das Arbeiten im Ausland bedeutet immer auch eine Selbstreflexion, in der Auseinandersetzung mit dem Kunden und in der Herangehensweise an eine Aufgabe.

What are you currently interested in and how is it feeding into your designs?
Unser Kerninteresse gilt immer der Fragestellung, wie sich die Identität unserer Kunden in ein unverwechselbares und überraschendes Projekt übersetzen lässt. Wir interessieren uns deshalb nicht für spezielle formale Elemente. Denn all dies leitet sich erst aus der Idee ab, nicht umgekehrt.

Comparing to other country which famous for its design, what’s German design’s characteristic?
Es ist schwierig, Stereotypen zu formulieren, die für ein ganzes Land gelten sollen. Aber es ist sicher so, dass uns Designer viele „deutsche Tugenden“ verbinden. Disziplin, Prozesssicherheit, Handwerklichkeit, Präzision, der Anspruch, alles bis ins letzte Detail durchzuarbeiten, das sind alles Dinge, die wir auch für unsere Arbeit einfordern und aus denen sich ein extrem hoher Qualitätsanspruch ableitet.

How did IPPOLITO FLEITZ GROUP begin? What were you (Peter) and your partners’ (Gunter) core values?
Wir haben uns direkt nach dem Diplom selbstständig gemacht. Wir hatten einfach diese Idee, nicht nur aus der Perspektive des Architekten zu schauen. Wir wollten unbedingt interdisziplinär arbeiten. Auf diesen Weg haben wir uns zunächst mit zwei weiteren Partnern gemacht. 2002 haben wir beide dann die Ippolito Fleitz Group gegründet. Unsere core values galten damals, genauso wie heute: Interdisziplinarität, Querdenken, Ideen zuzulassen, Identity Architects sein.

How would you describe your approach to design?
Egal was wir gestalten, es ist immer Kommunikation. Selbst einen Raum begreifen wir als gebaute Kommunikation. Die Wechselwirkung von Absender und Empfänger, welche Wirkung erzeugt eine Haltung, wie wird sie wahrgenommen. Das sind zentrale Motive in unserer Arbeit, die alle etwas mit Kommunikation zu tun haben.

What is the studio’s strongest or most identifying quality?
Surprise. Oft genug gelingt es uns, überraschende, einprägsame und doch präzise Bilder von hoher narrativer Kraft zu schaffen, die bis ins Detail durchgearbeitet und erfahrbar sind.

As an international firm, how do you approach diverse localities from project to project?
Wir sind auf unseren Märkten sehr präsent. Das bedeutet entweder, dass wir sehr häufig vor Ort sind, je nach Projekt auch mit mit großen Projektteams. In einigen Ländern sind wir permanent durch lokale Repräsentanten vertreten. Hier ist es uns wichtig, dass diese native speaker sind, damit sie unsere Kunden in Landessprache und Mentalität begleiten können. Und auch die Zusammensetzung in unserem Stuttgarter Büro ist sehr international. Wir sind mit Mitarbeitern aus neun Nationen so aufgestellt, dass wir auch von Stuttgart aus mit unseren Kunden in Landessprache kommunizieren können. Für China sind wir derzeit am überlegen, eine Repräsentanz zu schaffen.

Can you tell us about any projects you are currently working on that you are especially excited about?
Das ist momentan ganz klar der asiatische Markt und insbesondere China. Dort betreuen wir zum einen die Corporate Architecture von internationalen Marken wie adidas oder Walter Knoll. Spannend sind aber chinesische Marken, die wir für lokale Zielgruppen entwickeln. So verantworten wir für die Juwelierketten Dada und Keer die gesamte Markenstrategie von der Kommunikation im Raum bis zum Visual merchandising. Und für den Brillenhersteller Bolon entwerfen wir gerade neue Store-Konzepte. Alles Aufgaben, bei denen wir uns tief in die Psychologie des lokalen Marktes hineindenken müssen. Außerdem arbeiten wir gerade an einer neuen Shopping Mall in Moskau, entwerfen das Global Store Concept für Swarovski, entwickeln einen großen Sportkomplex in der Schweiz, betreuen in Deutschland eine neue Restaurantkette und arbeiten an mehreren spannenden Wohnprojekten.

What are your thoughts on generalization vs specialization? From the fields you have set foot in, such as interior, furniture, products, communication design, etc. How do you define your professional identity, architect or broad sense designer? How to distinguish from the current graphic design or advertising company work?
Auf dem Markt und in unsere Firma braucht es grundsätzliche erst einmal beides. Wir als Firma haben für uns den Begriff der Identity Architects entwickelt mit einem breit- und querdenkenden Ansatz. Gleichzeitig nährt sich die Qualität unserer Arbeit jenseits der konzeptorientierten Herangehensweise auch aus der Qualität unserer Mitarbeiter, die in ihrer jeweiligen Disziplin hoch spezialisiert sind. Diese Dialektik macht das besondere unserer Firma aus. Den Blick für das übergeordnete Ganze haben, aber auch herausragend im Detail sein.

You have designed a large amount of restaurant and commercial space, so what’s your opinion about the current situation and trends of worldwide restaurant space design?
Auf diesem Gebiet sind wir mittlerweile weit mehr als klassische Raumplaner, nämlich fast immer Mitgestalter oder gar Treiber einer umfassenden, ganzheitlichen Konzeptfindung. In einer Zeit, in der Design längst Teil der Alltagskultur ist und Trends immer schneller kommen und gehen, ist es immer schwieriger herauszustechen. Umso wichtiger wird es, Konzepten Haltung und Persönlichkeit zu verleihen, die mit hoher Konsistenz den Ort erlebbar und erinnerungs- und erzählfähig machen. In einer immer mehr beschleunigten Welt wird die Sehnsucht nach Authentizität und Storytelling am sogenannten Third Place immer wichtiger. Innovationen bewegen sich vor allem im Spannungsfeld zwischen Erdung und Technisierung: Einerseits die sinnliche und emotionale Übersetzung des Essangebots in den Raum, die Inszenierung des Zubereitungsprozesses, sowie das Weiterdenken Nachhaltigkeitsgedanke noch lange nicht zu Ende gedacht. Andererseits werden Abläufe und Erlebnisse zunehmend digital geprägt.

Your work repeatedly won the IF DESIGN AWARD form Germany, GOOD DESIGN AWARD from Japan, RED DOT AWARD from Germany, what’s the advantage do you think you have to win these well known awards constantly? Could you please share some impressive evaluations of the jury?
Die Preise sind zunächst eine tolle Bestätigung: für uns Gestalter und eigentlich noch viel mehr für unsere Kunden. Denn von unseren Kunden haben wir einen Vertrauensvorschuss für unsere Arbeit bekommen. Durch eine unabhängige Award-Jury wird dieses Vertrauensverhältnis bestätigt und belohnt.

What do you envisage interior design to look like in 10 years?
Unsere Arbeit als Gestalter war und ist immer beides, Spiegel und Treiber der gesellschaftlichen Bewegungen, der Sehnsüchte, der Ideen. Wir sehen deshalb zwei große Themen, die sicherlich das Design der Zukunft prägen und beeinflussen werden. Zum einen ist das die Auseinandersetzung mit unseren Ressourcen, die Wechselwirkung zwischen gebauter Welt und Umwelt, das Verhältnis von Stadt und Land. Wie wirkt beispielsweise die Megacity in die Gestaltung der konkreten Räume ihrer Bewohner hinein. Als zweites großes Thema sehen wir die Auseinandersetzung mit der virtuellen Welt. Das Erleben von virtuellen und realen Räumen wird verschmelzen und gleichzeitig werden sich daraus Gegenbewegungen entwickeln. Bewusst analoge und rein digitale Räume werden das andere Extrem und Fluchtpunkt einer Zielgruppe sein. Wir erwarten außerdem eine radikale Erweiterung unserer Materialwelt. In der Mode sind Wearables mittlerweile fast Alltag. Und auch in der Bauwelt wird es bald mehr und mehr Materialien geben, die intelligent sind und mit uns interagieren können. Auch das wird die Art zu bauen beeinflussen. Die Demokratisierung der Herstellung von Design, wie wir sie gerade durch die 3D-Drucker erleben, bedeutet außerdem, dass sich unser Berufsstand neu positionieren muss, um seine Daseinsberechtigung als Profession gegenüber einem wachsenden Laientum zu behalten.

What advice would give to students and young designers?
Just do it.

Panama Advertising Agency
da Loretta Trattoria
Bella Italia Weine
wgv Customer Centre
DER SPIEGEL canteen
Palace of International Forums »Uzbekistan«
Palace of International Forums »Uzbekistan«
Palace of International Forums »Uzbekistan«
Schorndorf Town Hall
Gerber Shopping Mall